Lesson Examples with Pictures


Examples of Lessons with Student Work and Pictures from Kindergarten Rotation

English Language Arts Lesson

Standard: W.K.2: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.

Goal: I can write about what my dream is.

Activity: Students learned about Martin Luther King Jr. by reading the story, “Martin’s Big Words” by Doreen Rappaport and then listened to a short, kid-friendly clip of his “I Have a Dream” speech. They were asked to write about what their dream was and provide and explanation for it. Their response was then put next to their picture, laminated, and hung in the hall.

The following are examples of student’s work from this activity.

lydia           micah

Students were assessed on standard W.K.2 with a formal assessment sheet to determine if their performance on the “I Have a Dream” writing activity was advanced, proficient, basic, or below basic. Click here to view the formal assessment sheet.

*Student’s names and faces have been blocked out for their protection.

 

Math Lesson

Standard: K.MD.B.3: Classify objects into given categories; count the number of objects in each category and sort the categories by count.

Goal: I can sort, count, and graph the candy hearts I have.

Activity: As part of our Valentine’s Day activities, each student received a box of candy hearts. Students were instructed to pour out their box of candy hearts onto the table and to sort their hearts by color. Then, they counted how many of each color heart they had and graphed it. The green and blue hearts were graphed together. Students color coded their graphed as well. They were also instructed to write the number of hearts they had for each color on their graph.

The following are examples of student’s work from this activity.

graph2 graph

Students were assessed on standard K.MD.B.3 with a formal assessment sheet to determine if their performance on the Candy Heart Graphing Activity was advanced, proficient, basic, or below basic. Click here to view the assessment sheet. Students were assessed as I walked around the room and assessed their performance. Click here to view the formal assessment sheet.

Click Here to View Additional Pictures of Lessons, Student Work, and Activities from Kindergarten Rotation

 *Student’s names have been blocked out for their protection.

 

Examples of Lessons with Student Work and Pictures from Third Grade Rotation

English Language Arts Lesson

Standard: CCRA.L.5: Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.

Goal: I can determine the meaning of an unknown phrase.

Activity: This was a two part lesson. For the first part of the lesson, students activated their prior knowledge by viewing pictures of idioms. I drew popsicle sticks to select students to identify what idiom the picture showed. You may view some of the idiom pictures I showed students below.

391616_9e7d_1024x2000 391696_64da_1024x2000

                                       “Frog in My Throat”                                          “Apple of My Eye”

Photo Credit: Worth1000.com

After activating their prior knowledge with these pictures, I read the book, “Amelia Bedelia” by Peggy Parish, aloud to students. I instructed students to give a thumbs up each time they heard an idiom in the book as we read. After reading, students completed the “Idioms with Amelia” activity. They wrote down four idioms from the book “Amelia Bedelia” and wrote what Amelia literally does and what the idiom really means. An assignment completion sheet was also used as an assessment for the “Idioms with Amelia” activity. Click here to view the Assignment Completion Sheet.

The following are examples of student’s work from this activity.

idiomswithameliaSabrina idiomswithameliacaleb

*You may click on the “Idioms with Amelia” Sheet to make it bigger*

As an additional assessment for this lesson, students completed an exit ticket where they answered the following questions, “What is an idiom? Give an example. Rate yourself as advanced (4), proficient (3), basic (2), or below basic (1).” Students wrote their answer on a post-it note and stuck it to the white-board underneath the question. An example of a completed exit ticket may be viewed below.

idiomexitticket

*Student’s names have been blocked out for their protection.

Science Lesson

Standard: NS.1.3.3: Conduct scientific investigations individually and in teams such as lab activities and field studies.

NS.1.3.4: Communicate the results of scientific investigations (e.g., age appropriate graphs, charts, and writings).

Goal: I can work with a group to design, build, and test a lunar lander that will protect it’s astronauts.

Activity: Students will complete the Lunar Lander Engineering Challenge. This activity ties in with Unit 5, which is called, “Investigating a Planet Called Earth and Beyond.” Students were asked the following question, “Can you design a lunar lander that will safely get your astronauts to the surface of the moon?” Students built upon their prior knowledge gained from informational text read about Apollo 11 and the first trip to the moon with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to design this lunar lander.

The rules for the challenge were as follows:

  • Each student in the group will be assigned a job. The jobs are Team Captain, Materials Manager, Recorder, and Reporter. You may view the job cards students wear on a lanyard around their neck below.

teamcaptain1     teamcaptain2

materialsmanager1   materialsmanager2

recorder1          recorder2

reporterONE reporter2

 

  • You must design a lunar lander that will safely drop the two large marshmallows (astronauts) exactly two feet to the ground (moon).
  • The astronauts must be the only things placed inside the cup (lander cabin).
  • Your goal is to build a lunar lander that keeps your astronauts safe while landing on the surface of the moon. *You will drop the lunar lander two feet.
  • You may not use any other materials than those provided to complete this challenge.
  • There are many different ways to complete this challenge. Be creative!
  • You may use the following materials: two index cards, 10 straws, 2 big marshmallows (astronauts), 10 mini marshmallows, two pieces of cardboard, tape, 4 rubber bands, and ten paper clips.

After building their lunar lander, the reporter from each group dropped the Lunar Lander two feet. If the astronauts did not fall out ,then they were successful in the Lunar Lander Challenge.

Students were assessed on standards NS.1.3.3 and NS.1.3.4 with a formal assessment sheet to determine if their performance on the Lunar Lander Student Lab Sheet was advanced, proficient, basic, or below basic. Click here to view the Formal Assessment Sheet.

The following are examples of a student’s work from this activity.

lilylabsheetfront lilylabsheetback

*You may click on the Lab Sheet to make it bigger*

Pictures from the Lunar Lander STEM Activity can be viewed below. These pictures show the importance of collaboration among students so they have the opportunity to share ideas and work together to complete an activity.

lunarpic3 lunarpic4 lunarpic2 lunarpic1

*Student’s names and faces have been blocked out for their protection.

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